By: Jennifer Witten | May 28, 2018 10:50:25As a teenage girl, I was captivated by crosswords.

    For years, my brother and I would go to the local bookstore to read crosswords together, and then we would do it again on Sundays.

    I was lucky enough to have a few friends who were very good at crosswords and, with my help, I had the privilege to practice it with my dad.

    The book was not my favorite.

    The puzzles were just too hard, and the words just too long.

    However, I found it really funny.

    It was a little odd, though, because I found myself reading the puzzles on Sundays at the same time as my father.

    We would have lunch together and play crosswords with our dad, and it was such a blast.

    The puzzle book I loved so much was not exactly the kind of book I would read as a teenager.

    I would be so embarrassed by it!

    I remember thinking, “Why not?”

    But as a young adult, I realized that this wasn’t exactly what I wanted to do.

    I wanted something a little more personal, something more like a puzzle book.

    So, I made my own book of crosswords, starting with the most basic and simple ones and working my way through the most challenging ones.

    The more I learned, the more I found that crosswords are really a wonderful exercise.

    I can think of no better way to get a sense of what I love than through crosswords as a way to practice my writing.

    I hope that one day you too can get out of your comfort zone and discover something that will challenge you in a way you never thought possible.

    For those of you who don’t know, I am a teenager and my dad is an older man.

    So I don’t have the experience that you might find in my younger siblings, but my parents do have a lot of experience with the challenges of crossword writing.

    We started teaching my dad how to write crosswords in the 70s, and we continued to do so until he was almost 70 years old.

    So when I was asked to write an introduction for the book, I knew that it would be a challenge to me.

    I also had a bit of advice for my dad on how to approach the book: “Be sure you’re taking your time with each word.

    Do not let the word count be too long, just be careful not to overthink it.”

    As we got older, my dad learned a lot about crosswords through my books.

    He used to sit in front of a wall and play the game with his friends, and he would ask me questions that would help him out in answering them.

    He also had some advice for me when it came to the puzzle book: “[T]his book will not be easy, but it will be fun to read.”

    So, that’s what I did, and I think I’m pretty happy with the result.

    RELATED ARTICLES