New Zealanders may have a new type and a new twist on the old one – dramatic writing.

    The Crown’s first novel, which will be adapted into a BBC Two drama, is based on the real-life events that unfolded in the life of Princess Margaret.

    “It was an idea that I had longed for, and that it wasn’t too far off,” says writer and producer Emma Mott.

    “I thought the idea of writing a book in the style of ‘A Crown for the King’ would be something that would be a little bit more interesting.”

    The book takes place in the reign of Queen Elizabeth II, and will follow her daughter Elizabeth’s rise to the throne, as well as her relationship with her son Philip.

    The book is being adapted by New Zealand writer Emma Muth, and the series will air on BBC Two.

    “The Crown for Elizabeth was written as an historical novel, but it’s also about a novel as well,” Ms Mott says.

    “We’ve been very lucky to get the opportunity to adapt it as a drama and to have the opportunity not just to write it as we see fit, but also to explore new ways to tell stories that are about a different kind of time.”

    In the past decade, dramatic literature has been gaining ground as a genre.

    “When I was a kid I didn’t think of it as fiction,” Ms Nohr says.

    “[I thought] it was about the stories you hear in the stories, but when I saw the novels it all just came together.”

    Ms Nolts first foray into drama was in the 1990s, when she was hired to write and direct a series of animated shorts.

    “My first one was based on a novel by Mary Shelley,” she says.

    This was her first major role in drama, and Ms Nohl says her work on the show was her most important experience.

    “All the people who worked with me on the series are so amazing people, so I really am indebted to them.”

    “It’s like a dream come true for me,” she adds.

    “For me to get to work with this amazing cast and crew on a show where the story is so important to us is incredible.”

    She credits her mentor, writer and executive producer, Julie Heseltine, as her main influence on her career.

    “Julie gave me a lot of ideas and advice that helped me become a better writer and a better director,” Ms Nyahr says of Ms Heseltines advice on how to write a dramatic.

    “She’s the only person I can really compare it to, and she’s also the person who really gave me the courage to do this.”

    Ms Heselts daughter, writer Sarah Nyahrs work is in many ways her mother’s legacy, and her mother says her daughter is “one of the most creative people I know”.

    “She writes so much about life,” Ms Hesitines daughter says.

    “‘A Crown For The King’ is an incredible story, but I think ‘A Dictator For The Crown’ is also a beautiful story.”

    Ms Nyahan says the characters she has written are not just her own, but are “based on people and events from my life and from her life”.

    “And I don’t think it’s because I’m a better person.

    I think it has more to do with a greater empathy for people,” she explains.

    The Crown for The King, the story of Elizabeth II’s reign as the Queen’s second in command, will be followed by the first volume of the series, and another book set to come out next year. “

    And it’s all very much rooted in how they see the world and how they think about it and how it affects them.”

    The Crown for The King, the story of Elizabeth II’s reign as the Queen’s second in command, will be followed by the first volume of the series, and another book set to come out next year.

    “So it’s a very long-term project,” Ms Miyahrs daughter says of the TV series.

    “That’s why we’ve been so patient and we’ve put so much time and effort into it.”

    The series will also feature a new spin on the Queen herself.

    The series is also set to explore the role of women in history, and explores the legacy of the British monarchy.

    “What happened to Elizabeth?

    What did she learn from her father and what did she do differently to her father?

    The Queen has had this huge role in history.

    We’re going to go back to that,” Ms Ayers says.

    For the first time, the series’ central character will be female.

    Ms Ayer, who is in her 50s, says the role is not “necessarily a big challenge”, but it will be important to her to reflect on her own experience.

    She says that in her personal life, it was “always there”.

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